How to spot a shark in the waves: Australian photographer in WA

ByDavid M. Conte

Mar 8, 2022

A chilling video that proves how hard it is to spot a shark in ocean waters has gone viral on social media.

Australian photographer Sean Scott, who captures incredible locations across the country, captured the grim video in Esperance, Western Australia on his drone.

The short clip of the cascading blue ocean is beautiful, and for a brief moment the shark can be seen.

Can you spot the beast lurking beneath the waves?

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Australian photographer Sean Scott, who shoots incredible places across the country, shared the video captured on his drone floating above the waves

In the video, the shark can be seen for a second at the bottom left of the frame slightly below the text

In the video, the shark can be seen for a second at the bottom left of the frame slightly below the text

In the video, the shark can be seen for a second at the bottom left of the frame slightly below the text: “Can you see the shark?”

Although the outline of the sea creature is faint, it is enough to notice it.

Hundreds of people tried to spot the shark in the comments to the video, but most were confused and had trouble spotting it.

A swimmer was killed by a suspected great white shark in Little Bay, Sydney, recently and it was the sixth shark attack in Australia in 2022.

This number of shark attacks in 2022 is already far ahead of any other country this year, and represents half of the total number of shark attacks in Australia in 2021.

In 2020, CSIRO estimated there could be up to 12,802 great white sharks – including juveniles – active around eastern Australia.

It follows after the Surf Life Saving Australia team issued a warning about the dangers of ocean currents.

An instructional video shared on Facebook outlines the different types of rips, but also explains what telltale signs parents and individuals should look for when frolicking in the waves.

The Surf Life Saving Australia team wanted to share with the public how difficult these dangerous currents are to spot

The Surf Life Saving Australia team wanted to share with the public how difficult these dangerous currents are to spot

In this image, the main rip runs down the center of the waves, with a second “feeder” rip giving it sideways power.

Dark patches of water, fewer breaking waves, a wavy surface, and anything—like sand—floating past the waves are all indicators that a rip might be nearby.

And while not all currents have these four signs, it is recommended to err on the side of caution, all individuals should swim between the red and yellow flags at a supervised beach.

In this image, the main tear runs down the center of the waves, with a second tear

In this image, the main tear runs down the center of the waves, with a second “power” tear giving it power to the side

These waves may look menacing, but it's what's lurking next to them that should worry you the most.
These waves may look menacing, but it's what's lurking next to them that should worry you the most.

These waves may look menacing, but it’s what’s lurking next to them that should worry you the most.

Former lifeguard Kenny Jewell has already taken to Facebook to share what he thinks are the key things to look out for to ensure you stay safe while in the water.

“The simplest thing to remember is that often the safest/quietest and most attractive area along a beach is usually a tear,” Mr Jewell wrote at the time.

“A rip is usually the area void of wave activity and appears darker and deceptively calmer.

“Always take 5-10 minutes when you get to the beach to observe the surf conditions and identify where these areas are.”

“The simplest thing to remember is that often the safest/quietest and most attractive area along a beach is usually a tear,” Mr Jewell wrote at the time.

If you can’t spot the danger before it’s too late, Jewell said, the most important thing to do is stay calm.

He says rips can move at three times the speed of an Olympic swimmer, so trying to fight the water is pointless.

‘If you get caught in a tear, DON’T PANIC. Switch to floating mode and raise one arm as a distress signal when possible,’ the former lifeguard wrote.

“See which way the rip takes you…once you determine it, and if you have the energy, swim to the right or left of the direction of the current, never against it.”

“Most rips won’t get you very far and will usually spit you out shortly after they get you, so stay calm and save your energy.”